Standing Desk Hacks for the Standee Classic & XL

Our desktop series is comprised of two models, the Classic and Classic XL. Each comes in four different heights and two different colors of bamboo. They are fixed height desktop add-ons so you choose the right size for you based on your height. They assemble in no time and are designed to be foldable so you can easily store the desk under or on the side of your desk when you want to sit. A common misconception with our desktop models is that you have to disassemble them in order to sit. This is not true. There are a few hacks to make using the Standee Classic & XL very enjoyable.

Standee Classic Bamboo Standing Desk

1. Get a stool. If you get a stool then there is no need to disassemble your Classic. All you need to do is push the stool to the side when you want to stand and then place it back in front of the desk when you want to sit. Easy as that. You can get a nice, height adjustable stool with a footrest for only $35 on Amazon.

Standee Classic XL Bamboo Standing Desk with Stool

 

2. Put laptop under the desk. If you are a laptop user and you do not feel like getting a stool or disassembling your desk when you want to sit, then simply place the laptop underneath your Standee Classic or XL. As long as you have the space under your desk then this is an easy solution for someone with a regular office chair.

Standee Classic XL Bamboo Standing Desk Sitting

3. Maximize the space under your desk. Many people think that putting one of our desktop units on top of their desk takes up a lot of space. But, it actually increases the surface area of your desk. You are able to use the space on top of the Classic as well as the space underneath it. Maximize it. Put post-its, file holders, or whatever office supplies you need below it, and they will remain hidden from co-workers while remaining easily accessible. This will actually help to reduce the clutter on your work surface.

Standee Classic XL Bamboo Standing Desk Sitting Inside View

The Standee Classic and Standee Classic XL are awesome affordable options for people interested in taking a stand at work or at home.

Great Video Spreading Awareness of the Dangers of Sitting—Part II

In our last blog we introduced you to a great video explaining the dangers of sitting. In today’s blog we’ll tell you about a second video that we also think is well worth your time.

Video 2: Are You Sitting Too Much?

Video Time: 3:02 min.

Views: 2,456,717

 

The popular Youtube channel AsapSCIENCE created this viral video using whiteboard marker animation. The video is more concise than the video we mentioned in our last blog but contains an equal amount of useful information. Here are a few of the key points from the video:

  • As soon as you sit down the electrical activity in your muscles drops significantly and your calorie-burning rate plummets to about 1 calorie per minute.
  • After only 3 hours of sitting, there is a 50% drop in artery dilation and a resultant decrease in blood flow.
  • Sit for 24 hours straight, and the insulin in your body loses nearly 40% of its ability to uptake glucose, which increases the risk of Type 2 diabetes.
  • After 2 weeks of sitting for more than 6 hours a day, LDL cholesterol, sometimes called the “bad” cholesterol, is increased, along with other fatty molecules, putting you at a greater risk for weight gain.
  • Because of prolonged inactivity, your muscles begin to break down. Gradually, their contractions become weaker, ultimately impeding the pumping of blood to the heart.
  • Even if you work out regularly, the minute you stop moving the deterioration begins again, in proportion to your sitting time.
  • That’s the scary part; research shows that just as exercise doesn’t necessarily counteract the negative effects of something like smoking, it doesn’t counteract the negative effects of too much sitting.
  • Some studies in women have even shown a decrease in bone mass upwards of 1% every year.
  • Perhaps most shocking is that after 10-20 years of sitting for 6 hours a day, you may have lost up to 7 quality-adjusted life years—that is, years without medical issues or death.
  • The risk of dying from heart disease increases by 64% while the risk of prostate or breast cancer increases by 30% (based on above stat).
  • Simply put, our bodies aren’t designed to be sedentary.

I urge you to take a moment to watch these videos to be informed on the detrimental effects sitting imposes on your body. If you are moved by the information, share these videos with friends and most importantly start moving! If a standing desk is the solution for you or if you want to learn more about standing desks as a solution, visit our store and check out some of the affordable natural add-on podiums like the Standee Classic and Standee Classic XL.

Great Video Spreading Awareness of the Dangers of Sitting—Part I

I stumbled across two videos that did a great job explaining the dangers of sitting. This blog will highlight the first video, and our next blog will do the same for the second video. 

Video 1: Why Sitting is Bad for You

Viewing Time: 5:05 min.

Views: 974,462

This awesome video is part of the TedEd Lessons Worth Sharing series. In the video Murat Dalkilinc investigates the hidden risks of sitting down. Not only is the video animation engaging but also the video is really educational and covers a lot of points that have not been mentioned in other articles and media coverage. It’s only five minutes of your time and definitely well worth the watch. Here are a few of the key points from the video:

 

  • The longer you stay put, the more agitated your body becomes. It sits there counting down the moments until you stand up again and take it for a walk.
  • The human body is built to move, and you can see evidence of that in the way it’s structured. Inside us are over 360 joints and about 700 skeletal muscles that enable easy, fluid motion.
  • Our body depends on us moving around to be able to circulate properly. Our nerve cells benefit from movement, and our skin is elastic, meaning it molds to our motions.
  • A common way of sitting is with a curved back and slumped shoulders, a position that puts uneven pressure on your spine. Over time, this causes wear and tear in your spinal discs, overworks certain ligaments and joints, and puts strain on muscles that stretch to accommodate your back’s curved position.
  • Sitting for long periods also temporarily deactivates lipoprotein lipase, a special enzyme in the walls of blood capillaries that breaks down fats in the blood, so when you sit you’re not burning fat nearly as well as when you move around.
  • Being stationary reduces blood flow and the amount of oxygen entering your blood stream through your lungs. Your brain requires both of those things to remain alert, so your concentration levels will most likely dip as your brain activity slows.
  • Researchers have worked out that, worldwide, inactivity causes about 9% of premature deaths a year. That’s over 5 million people.
  • So what seems like such a harmless habit actually has the power to change our health.

One of the shortcomings of the video is it doesn’t cover practical solutions that can help people avoid prolonged periods of sitting. Standee Co. offers some great, in expensive solutions including stand-up desks and anti-fatigue mats.

Great Britain in the Vertical World War

             In the midst of the Vertical Revolution, Americans across the country are using the health risks of sitting as the main ammunition to take over sedentary lifestyles. However, in reality, it should be termed the Vertical World War because the U.S. is not alone in this fight. Many other countries like Australia and Britain are taking a stand as well and urging the many citizens to follow suit. Great Britain, specifically, has a very useful website, GetBritainStanding.org, for anyone in the world considering making the switch to a sit-stand station.

 

            GetBritainStanding.org has rich content on the many aspects of sedentary work environments. The content helps to inform people of the health risks associated with sitting as well as offer solutions to employers and employees. Under the health risks tab, “The Sitting Problem,” is presented along with the top 10 health risks and the research that has been done thus far.  Furthermore, there is a tab for their "Active Working” campaign that has many resources for educating companies on the productivity, engagement, and reduced absenteeism benefits of Active Working. 

 

            Two tabs on GetBritainStanding.org I would like to highlight as being very useful are the “Employers” and “Solutions” tabs. The section for employers has a comprehensive review of everything one needs to know to convert his or her office from a sedentary to an active work environment. This tab also includes key information for employers, the costs of sitting, regulations, and other necessary parts for an employer to consider. It also has a link to reserve a spot at the annual Active Working Summit, where companies are educated on the many benefits of active working. The “Solutions” tab is also significant because it offers many sit-stand solutions with desktop risers similar to the Standee Classic, help with getting started, as well as discount vouchers. Moreover, in this tab there is a section for one to post and read stories and experiences regarding the switching to a sit-stand station as well as Q & A.  

 

            One of the unique features on this site is the “Sitting Calculator” which is conveniently placed directly on the homepage. This calculator allows you to determine your risk level based on your sitting time. To do this, the calculator asks you to estimate the time you spend sitting daily while you eat, commute, work, and relax. After estimating the amount of time in each of these areas, you hit calculate and see your risk level which ranges from “low” to “very high.” Next time you get a chance, go on to GetBritainStanding.org and check out your risk level, it may motivate you to start standing today!

            GetBritainStanding.org does a great job at including the necessary information one needs if they are considering switching to an active work environment. Although many of the statistics displayed on the site such as “British people sit for 8.9 hours each day (on average)” are directed towards the British, all of the information regarding the health risks and transition to standing is universal and should be brought to the attention people around the world that are making, or considering to make, the change. Check it out now. 

10 Office Exercises You Can Do at Work

The main idea behind an active work environment is to avoid sitting for prolonged periods of time.  Therefore, if you sit at a desk for the majority of the day, there are many exercises that you can do to disrupt your time sitting.

 

There are many ways to avoid sitting all day such as using a stand up desk like the Standee Classic or simply getting out of your chair and doing a few exercises.  If you are creative, the office provides a perfect place to get in a quick workout.

 

There are multiple office exercises that you can find with a simple Google search, but which ones make the most sense? Here are 10 of my favorites:

 

1. Tricep Desk Dips

Place your butt on the edge of your desk, and then place your palms on the edge of the desk on either side of you. Keeping your feet together, bend at the elbows and slide forward off the desk and dip down a few inches, and then push back up. Dip to where your elbows are bent at 90 degrees. Do this 20 times. For a variation, put your feet on a chair.

 

http://www.forbes.com/pictures/efkk45efdje/tricep-desk-dips-2/

 

2. Carpal Tunnel Reliever 

You shouldn’t suffer from carpal tunnel syndrome if you do this exercise daily. Stand at your desk, and with arms straight, place your palms on the desk with your fingers pointed toward you. Lower your body slowly until you feel the stretch. Do for 15 seconds. Repeat as needed through the day.

 

http://www.forbes.com/pictures/efkk45efdje/carpal-tunnel-reliever-2/

 

3. Water Bottle Workouts

As most offices don’t have workout equipment, a full water bottle can work as the perfect light dumbbell.

 

Sit tall with abs pulled in. Hold water bottle in right hand and curl it up towards your shoulder. Repeat 15 times. Change arms.

 

You can also use your water bottle to do front arm raises and overhead presses.

Hold your water bottle in right hand. Bend elbow. Extend arm overhead. Repeat on other side.

 

Water bottle twists are a great way to work your waistline.

Hold water bottle at chest level. Twist to the right as far as you can. Twist back to center. Twist to the left. Repeat 10 times. 

http://health.howstuffworks.com/wellness/diet-fitness/exercise-at-work/10-office-exercises-you-can-do-secretly.htm#page=7

 

 

4. The Wall (Street) Sit

Wall sits are great for building strength and endurance. Standing with your back against the wall, bend the knees and slide your back down the wall until your thighs are parallel to the floor. Sit and hold for 30-60 second.

 

http://greatist.com/fitness/deskercise-33-ways-exercise-work

 

5. The Seated Leg Raiser

This incognito stretch will allow you to get in a good stretch without having all your co-workers notice. While seated, straighten one or both legs and hold in place for five or more seconds. Then lower your leg(s) back to the ground without letting your feet touch the floor. Repeat (alternating legs if raising them separately) for 15 reps. You can also put a purse or briefcase strap over your ankle for added weight, or for more of an abs workout, add a crunch.

 

http://greatist.com/fitness/deskercise-33-ways-exercise-work

 

6. The Knuckle Sandwich

For a great arm workout, try shadow boxing. Stand (if you can) and throw out a few jabs, hooks, and uppercuts in rapid succession. Continue for a minute or longer to blow off steam and tone the arms, chest, and core.

 

http://greatist.com/fitness/deskercise-33-ways-exercise-work

 

7. The Hulk

Walk in place and lean forward. With your elbows bent and fists together in front, move your arms like wings. Try to touch your shoulder blades together. 20 reps.

 

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/special/health/workout-at-work/

 

8. Walking

Lap your block or a floor of your office. Try for a pace of 100 steps per minute, which is an easy pace to maintain around the office.  Walk for 10 min.

 

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/special/health/workout-at-work/

 

9. Take the Stairs. While You're At It, Run Up Them

Instead of using the elevator to move between floors, take the stairs. Start off walking, but work your way up to a full out sprint. This is a great way to get an intense leg workout while at the office.

 

http://www.artofmanliness.com/2012/07/24/desk-jockey-workout/

 

10. Get a Standing Desk

One of the best things you can do to combat the health risk from sitting is to get a standing desk. The negative health effects on your weight and health, including hip and back stiffness and pain, that come from sitting down all day will disappear. You can even lean against your standing desk while you are working and do simple calf stretches.

 

http://www.artofmanliness.com/2012/07/24/desk-jockey-workout/

5 Common Misconceptions About Switching to a Stand Up Desk

1. You have to replace your desk.

Many people believe that in order to reap the benefits of standing, you must replace your desk. It can be very expensive to replace your existing office desk with a height adjustable standing desk. This is not necessary. There are many options that will allow you to stand without replacing your entire desk such as add-on podiums like the Standee Classic.  If you have an add-on feature to your desk then you are able to stand without spending a large sum of money.

 

2. You have to stand all day.

Just because you are switching to a stand up desk you do not have to stand all day. It takes time to build up the strength to stand for long periods of time. Starting out you can stand for a short time span like 20 minutes every couple hours and then slowly begin to stand for longer periods of time.  Switching to standing is a process, not a simple transition.

 

3. You will get varicose veins.

Standing for prolonged periods of time does not cause varicose veins.  Rather, varicose veins and other vein conditions are caused by the failure of the leg pump. In leg pump failure, the blood goes down the arteries from the heart into the leg, but the veins cannot pump the blood back out of the leg. Failure of the leg pump is usually due to the valves failing- a condition generally attributable to genetics.  Standing for long periods of time does not cause varicose veins, but in some cases they may allow them to form more quickly in people who already have lost their valves when they were younger.

 

4. You just need to stand.

In order to fully reap the benefits of standing, you don’t just need to stand, you need to stand the correct way. There are many different aspects to the correct standing posture such as keeping your head and shoulders back as well as putting most of your weight on the balls of your feet. Check out our blog “The Correct Way to Stand and Sit” for more information on the proper standing posture.

 

5. Any height of desk will work as long as you can stand at it.

The fact that you can stand to do work at your new stand up desk does not mean it is the right one for you. It is essential that you have a desk that is the right height. Standing the correct way, your arms should be resting on the desk at a 90° angle. Make sure you choose the height of desk that will allow for that angle, and don’t forget to take into account the extra height you will gain from an anti-fatigue mat (which is highly recommended) like the Standee Mat. See the “How to Choose What Size Standee” chart for more information on choosing the correct height for your desk. 

Stand For Your Health

    Jim Hollen Standing stand up deskOver the last several years we’ve heard a lot about the negative health effects of a sedentary lifestyle. Sitting, they say, is the new smoking. Among the most startling claims made by recent clinical studies is that sitting for more than 3 hours per day can reduce your life expectancy by up to 2 years. Even regular exercise cannot counteract the negative health effects of sitting. There is a compelling body of medical evidence that suggests that standing increases your metabolism, burns calories, reduces back pain, increases productivity, and improves overall health.

 

            My story might be similar to a some of yours. Athletics have been a huge part of my life since my childhood. I’ve always exercised regularly. I eat a plant-based, whole foods diet (i.e., vegan) and am conscientious about making good health choices. A few years ago, I developed a hip flexor injury after a ski trip. I went to physical therapy and learned what I thought was a running injury was actually a “sitting injury.” My physical therapist explained to me that when you sit for prolonged periods of time, your muscles, tendons, and ligaments in your legs and hips get short and tight. This is the opposite of what happens when you run, walk, or stand. I guess years of sitting at a desk grinding it out for 12-18 hours a day finally caught up with me.

 

            In addition to stretching and strengthening to solve my injury, I decided to start standing at work. I had the guys in our shop make a little podium that I could put on top of my desk. I put my laptop on top of the podium. It was a pretty basic set-up, but it worked. Standing enabled me to elongate my hip flexor muscles which really helped to reduce the tightness in my hips. I found myself doing calf stretches throughout the day as well. In general, I found myself moving around a lot more during the day and not having that compression in my lower back that starts to build up after hours of sitting. I got an anti-fatigue mat that was really cushy and made standing really easy. I found that all of the benefits of standing that I had read about were true. I felt more active, more productive, more alert, more empowered, and just generally healthier.

 

            After realizing how much standing helped me, we decided to start making stand-up desks for other people with the idea that maybe we could help them too. We came up with a simple but elegant design. Like the solution the guys in the shop madStandee Classic XL stand up standing podium deske for me, our first product, The Standee Classic, was a desktop podium product that folded flat and easily assembled with no tools. We added the Standee Classic-XL to meet the needs of our customers who wanted a larger desk podium with a little more real estate to work. We also added a really great anti-fatigue mat to complement our standing desk product line which we ingeniously named “StandeeMat.”

 

            We wanted to make our stand up desks out of eco-friendly materials so we chose bamboo, which is not only beautiful, but it is one of the most eco-friendly materials on earth.  We also wanted to make our desks in the U.S., not just because we wanted superior craftsmanship, but because we wanted to do our small part in helping to create jobs and support the U.S. economy.

 

            It’s been interesting to watch the market for stand-up desks grow. A lot of companies offer full-desk solutions with “adjustable height” models that go up and down with the push of a button. I suppose there are people who are looking to replace their conventional desk with a fancy solution. But, for me, I think it is all about standing. I view it more as an issue of will than an issue of equipment. I don’t need a fancy motorized desk to stand. I just want to stand and feel better. It reminds me of those guys who get the fancy weight lifting and exercise equipment and get everything synced with their new iPhone exercise app. I like the approach where you just run hard for an hour or accomplish just as much with a simple set of dumb bells and a pull-up bar. You don’t need a lot of fancy equipment to stand at work. You just need to stand. There are plenty of opportunities throughout the day to sit—meetings, lunch, commuting, etc. My advice is to start standing and not worry about finding a solution that makes it easy to sit.

Standee Classic -The Sustainable Bamboo Standing Desk

When the Standee team set out to create a new benchmark for the Standing Desk market, two things were important to our mission.

We set a goal to make whatever we could here in America and secondly, offer a sustainable version of a Standing Desk that offered a high value item built to last.

Bamboo became an object of our affection as we learned more about it. It became clear early on that our entry round of products needed to be a simple solution crafted from sustainable Bamboo and made in America.

Standee The World's Strongest Standing Desk

We're not sure if we now make the world's strongest / toughest standing desk, but it could be possible.



While working on sizing the desks for our own use here at Standee HQ, we began to notice that the BamTuff Bamboo that we were building the desks out of was unusually durable and strong.

This lead us to the idea of putting our standing desks to the test with heavy stuff. First we stacked books on the desks until we could fit no more books on them. Then we had our shop foreman (not a small guy) jump up on down on a Standee Classic, the Classic took the abuse and remained intact.

Frustrated because we couldn't figure out how to test the load durability to the breaking point, we scratched our heads and then came up with an idea.


Why not park a vehicle on the desk?


We used a 3600-4200lbs? (Estimated) Toyota Tacoma 4 x 4 V6 and placed four Standee Classics under it. One under each tire.

While it's still unknown what the truck actually weighs, it's certainly a bit more than what we expect the average customer may place on the desk.... by about a few thousand pounds. So it's safe to say that your Standee Classic standing desk should hold up to years of use.

Now for a quick slide show.  ( By the way - Don't try this at home.. we're pretty sure there are safer ways to test the weight baring ability.. but none with such a Wow factor)

We built four Standee Classics from left over parts that we had in the shop.

Using a forklift, we raised the rear of the vehicle first and placed the desks under the rear tires, then repositioned the forklift and placed the Standee Classic standing desks under the front.

Now for the true test.

 

So that's that.. The Standee Classic Standee Desk is the little desk that could. :)

 

 

 

The Adventures Of a Standing Desk (a user story)

A review of using the Standee standing desk. Will it help or hinder productivity and in this case - some back pain?

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